Primitive Hexie Table Rug (Crochet and Embroidery Hexagon Table Rug)

purplehexiesmI am a multi crafter.  There are so many crafts that play wonderfully together in a single project.  This is one of those multi craft project.  This 12 inch diameter wool felt table rug incorporates embroidery and crochet to create this beautiful, textural design.

To create this design you will want to gather;

Wool Felt – this project was created from a wool / rayon blend.  I do prefer to use either a predominantly wool or wool / rayon blend. I’m not a huge fan of acrylic for this project, but it can be used. 

Worsted Weight (4) yarn in 2 colors.  I used Paton’s Classic wool in a single color and in a self striping color.

Size “G” (4.25) crochet hook

Large eye (tapestry or crewel), sharp point needle for sewing hexies to felt and to embroider blanket stitch edging.

Crewel wool (tapestry wool) for blanket stitch.  Some people may want to use their worsted yarn to blanket stitch the edging of the mat.  Be sure and text your yarn before you make your decision.  Some worsted yarns will abrade quickly and pull apart if you attempt to use as decorative stitching.

Tracing pen or pencil

Scissors

Spray adhesive

Shaping / blocking materials as desired.

Plate or tray, ect to make a circular rug base.

Instructions

Trace round object (I used a large plate) to felt and cut out.  (I only cut one base out.  Sewing may alter the size a bit. After I finish sewing the hexies in place, I use the finished rug top to serve as a template to cut the 2nd rug base)

Crochet Hexies (I used a pattern that I learned back in the 1970’s. It is a traditional hexed granny pattern that has been around “FOR – EVER.” 

Hexie Pattern (make 1 central and 6 surrounding)

Ch 4 (or you can do a magic circle) Join to form a ring,

Rnd 1, Ch 3 (counts as a dc now and through out) Work 11 more dc in to the ring. Join to top of beg ch 3 with a

Slip stitch (12)

Rnd 2,  Ch 3, Work 1 dc in the same stitch,  ch 1,  *Work 2 dc in the next stitch, ch 1*  Repeat from * to * around.

Join to top of beginning ch 3 with a slip stitch.  (24 dc and 12 ch 1 spaces)

Rnd 3,  Slip Stitch over to first ch 1 space, Work a Ch 3, dc, ch 3 and 2 dc in that same ch 1 space, Work 2 dc in the next

Ch 1 space.  *Work 2dc, ch 3, 2 dc in the next ch 1 space. Work 2 dc in the next ch 1 space* repeat from * to *

around.  Join to top of beginning ch 3 with a slip stitch.

Rnd 4, Ch 1, Work a sc in the same stitch as joining.  (Work 1 single crochet in each single crochet and Work 3 sc in each

Ch 3 space around) Join to beginning sc with a slip stitch.  Cut and secure yarn.

Shape and block as desired. 

Fold rug base in quarters to find center. Mark center.  Position central hexie in place. (use spray adhesive if desired to hold hexies in place while sewing) Whip stitch in place.  Position each remaining hexies around central hexie.  Whip stitch in place.

Place finished rug base top to felt designated for rug base bottom. (use spray adhesive if desired) Cut to size.

With tapestry wool, blanket stitch around. 

If you feel that you need to press the rug, place it face down on a padded surface, cover with a pressing cloth.

The washability will depend on the fiber content of both the felt and the yarn.

Karen Glasgow Follett 2015

 

 

 

Miniature Doll Chair in Crochet

Miniature Doll Chair in Crochet

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Crochet a chair that would be a welcome addition to even the most discerning doll’s house. The finished sizes of these chairs are; 2 ½ inches from base to top of chair, 1 inch from base to seat. 1 ¼ inches in seat diameter. So perfect for small dolls that delight today’s children and for those vintage small dolls that delight the adult collector!

minichair2

 

Materials Needed

4ply WW yarn                
Size “F” (3.75 mm)

Tapestry needle

Size 7 mesh plastic Canvas

Plastic canvas circles

Scissors

Fiber fill or cotton ball

Tape measure optional

Stitches Used

Single Crochet (sc)

Double Crochet (dc)

Slip Stitch (sl st)

Half Double Crochet (hdc)

Chain (ch)

Whip stitch sewing

The Plastic Canvas Frame

Cut a 1 ¼ inch circle for the seat

Cut a 1 inch circle for the back

Cut a 1 inch wide strip for the side. (you can cut the length down when you get ready to join the two ends)

Align the side of the chair side with the side of the chair seat. With yarn and tapestry needle, whip stitch side to seat. Cut length of side as needed to align, and whip stitch chair sides together. Do not cut yarn as yet.

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Place desired amount of fiber fill in chair base. Using yarn and needle, secure fiber fill with a few stitches taken from side to side. Cut and secure yarn.

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Pattern

Chair seat and sides

Special notes: The beginning of each round chain is not considered as a stitch throughout the

                          pattern.

                         The number in () is the stitch count at the end of the row / round

Seat

Magic circle (if you are not comfortable with a magic circle, begin with a ch2 and work in the 2nd ch from the hook)

Rnd 1 – Ch 1, Work 10 hdc in the loop, join to beginning hdc with a sl st. (10)

Rnd 2 – Ch 1, Work 2 hdc in same stitch as joining, Work 1 hdc in next stitch. *Work 2 hdc in

next stitch, 1 hdc in the next stitch* Repeat from * to * around.

Join to beginning hdc with a sl st. (15)

Side

Rnd 3 – Ch 1, Working in back loops (BL) Work 1 hdc in each stitch around.

Join to beginning hdc with a sl st. (15)

Rnd 4 – Repeat Round 3. (15) Leaving a long yarn tail for whip stitching, cut and secure yarn.

Bottom

Repeat Seat instructions (magic circle, round 1 and round 2) Cut and secure yarn

Place chair seat and sides over the chair base (fiber fill is facing up). This will be a snug fit.

Place chair bottom against plastic canvas circle of chair base.

Thread yarn tail through tapestry needle and whip stitch chair sides to chair bottom. Cut and secure yarn, bury ends in the chair base / fiber fill.

Back

(make 2)

Magic circle

Ch 1, Work 15 dc in the loop. Join to beginning dc with a sl st. Leaving a long tail, cut and

secure yarn.

Sandwich the 1 inch plastic canvas circle between the front and back pieces of the chair back. With long tail, whip stitch (or sc stitch) chair back pieces together. Align chair back with unworked loops of round 3 of chair seat / side. Whip stitch chair back to chair base through at least 3 stitches.

Arms

(make 4)

Ch 1, Work 7 sc in the loop. Join with a sl st to beginning sc. Leaving a long tail, cut and

secure yarn.

Align 2 arm sides together. Whip stitch (or sc stitch) sides together. Repeat with other 2 chair arm sides. Place chair arm abutting both the unworked loops of round 3 and the side back. With long tail of yarn, whip stitch chair arms to chair base and chair back. Repeat with other arm.

Skirt (optional)

Join yarn to the unused loops of round 4,

Ch 2, (does not count as a stitch) Work 1 dc in same stitch as joining, ch 1, *Work 1 dc in next

loop, ch 1* Repeat from * to * around. Join to beginning dc with a sl st.

Cut and secure yarn. Weave in ends.

Cpr 2015 Karen Glasgow Follett Designs

 

 

                         

Crochet Amigurumi Fish Pattern- Catch Me If You Can!

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Several years ago, my sister and I received a fun fishing game for Christmas.  This was during the mid part of the 1960s – prior to much attention being placed on the safety of children and their games.  This particular game had magnetized fish that “swam” along an electrified board.  Each fish had a metal loop for a mouth and each fishing pole had a metal hook at the end of a long wire. Regardless of the significant electrical shocks that we received, we did have a good time playing this game. 

A few weeks ago, I saw a post on a social media site that showed a homemade version of this game. Plush fish were used. Each fish had a magnetic mouth and each pole had a magnet attached to the line to attract and “catch” each fish.  I couldn’t find a pattern associated with this new hand created version. After searching several sites that did provide sewing, crochet and knitting patterns of various fish, and not finding a fish style that suited my aesthetics, I decided to create my own pattern. 

This pattern was created to make this fishing game for my granddaughter. Of course, the usual disclaimers would be in place. This pattern uses magnets, poking devices and small parts, so the finished product is not be suitable for animals, small children and some adults who tend to put things in their mouths.

You will need the following supplies;

  • Yarn in both fish color and fin color, I used a 4ply ww yarn. You could adjust this to make your fish smaller or larger. This is a great stash buster as each fish doesn’t require much yarn. One skein will yield an entire school of fish
  • “E” or 3.5 mm crochet hook
  • stitch marker
  • fiber fill
  • 6mm beads for eyes
  • Sewing thread and needle
  • tapestry or other large eye needle
  • Dowel
  • Plain Shank Button
  • Tape
  • Strong Disk magnets
  • Glue
  • Scissors

fishsupplies

Fish Crochet pattern

Special notes;

Unless directed, do not join rounds. You may want to place a stitch marker (safety pin, ect) into the first stitch of each round to keep your place.

Unless directed, each stitch of the fish body is worked in the back loop only (this is the top of the stitch loop that is furthest away from you) You will be later attaching fins to some of the unused loops and the remaining unused loops give a “scale” quality to your fish.

Stitches Used

  • Chain – Ch
  • Single Crochet – sc
  • Slip stitch – Sl st
  • Double Triple Crochet – dtr
  • Triple Crochet – tr
  • Double Crochet – dc
  • Single Crochet Decrease – sc dec
  • Half double crochet – hdc

Create a magic circle or Ch 2,

Round 1,  Work 6 sc in the magic circle (or in the 2nd ch from the hook) 6

Round 2,  *Work 2 sc in next sc, work 1 sc in next sc* Repeat from * to * around (9)

Round 3,  Work 2 sc in each sc around. (18)

Round 4,  *Work 2 sc in next sc, 1 sc in next 2 sc* Repeat from * to * around (24)

Round 5,   Work a sc in each sc around (24)

Rounds 6 – 8, Repeat Round 5 (24)

Round 9,  *Work sc in next 2 sc, sc dec through next 2 sc* Repeat from * to * around. (18)

Rounds 10 & 11, Work a sc in each sc around (18)

Round 12, *Work sc in next sc, sc dec through next 2 sc*  Repeat from * to * around (12)

Rounds 13 & 14, Work a sc in each sc around (12)

At the end of round 14, cut and secure yarn.  Turn fish body inside out, so the unused loops are showing on the outside of the fish body.

Stuff fish as desired with fiber fill.

Align the 12 stitches of round 14 so that each stitch lays against its opposite stitch. (ie 12 is across from 1, 11 is across from 2, ect) See picture

fishtail

Tail

With yarn color designated for the tail, insert your hook into both aligned stitches, stitch fish body closed with a sc in each stitch couple. (6 sc)

Ch 5, work a dtr and a tr in the 1st sc, Work a dc and a hdc in the next sc, Work a sc in the next 2 sc, Work a hdc and a dc in the next sc, and a tr and a dtr in the last sc, Ch 5, sl st chain to same last sc.  Cut and secure yarn,

Dorsal Fin

With fish facing you and tail fin vertical; locate the unused loops of round 6. “Eye” a straight line between the tail and the fish front.  You will be working the unused loops on either side of that line together in rounds 6, 7 and 8. Working in this manner provides a centered a more secure attachment for the dorsal fin.  See picture

fishdorsalfin

With yarn designated for dorsal fin, *insert hook into first unused loop, yarn over, and draw back through, Insert hook into unused loop of adjacent stitch, yarn over and draw back through loop, Yarn over and draw back trough all loops on hook.* Ch 1, Repeat from * to * in the unused loops of round 7, ch 2, Repeat from * to * round 8. 

Ch 4, Work 2 dc in the same stitch worked in round 8’s unused loops, Work dc in next ch 1 space, Work hdc in the next stitch worked in round 7’s unused loops, Work a sc in the next ch 1 space, Work a sl st in the stitch worked in round 6’s unused loops. If desired, work another sl st around the post of the round 6 sc directly in front of the dorsal fin.  Cut and secure yarn.

Side fins. 

You will work one side with the fish face facing you and the other side with the tail facing you.

Again, locating the unused loops of round 6, count down 6 loops from the dorsal fin. With fin color yarn, insert hook into that unused loop and attach yarn with a sl st.  ch 1, and sc into the same loop, Working toward the dorsal fin, work 2 dc, ch3, 2 dc in the next unused loop, sc, ch1 and sl st in the next unused loop. Cut and secure yarn.  Repeat this sequence on the opposite side of the fish for the other fin.

Optional fish lips

If you are wanting plush fish and no magnet, you can create lips for your fish.

Locate the unused loops of the 1st round, Insert hook into one of the loops and attach yarn with a sl st. *Work ch 1 and sl st in the next loop* Repeat from * to * around.  Ch 1, and join to beginning sl st.  Cut and secure yarn.

With tapestry needle (or other large eye needle) bury all yarn ends into the fiber fill. 

Attach beads to create the fish eyes, bury the thread ends in the fiber fill.

Magnets

Make sure that you are using the attracting sides of the magnets. Glue one magnet to fish face. Glue the other magnet to the shank button.  Allow both ample drying time.

Fishing Pole

Attach yarn or other “line” to pole and secure with tape.  Thread other end through the shank of the button.

Now you are set for a fun fishing experience!

Karen Glasgow Follett 2015

Guided Imagery Setting our Inner Magnet

Our Inner Magnet
Every experience that we outwardly have is created in place by our internal magnetic force.  This magnetic force is comprised from our intent, our expectations and our emotions. The energetic flow that carries these intentions, expectations and emotions is the chakra system.
As we view any light bulb, the halo of light that is produced by the bulb is readily apparent.  This halo of light is created by the inner components (or filament) of the light bulb.  Now, compare this halo of light to the aura of our physical bodies.
The aura is the corona of energy that surrounds us. This energetic halo is responsible for the magnetic attraction or deflection of the events of our lives.  Our energetic halo is created by our inner filament of the chakra system.  The thoughts, expectations and emotions that reside in our chakra system fuels the magnetic pull of our auras.
Guided Imagery
Become aware of your physical body.  Allow your eyes to close or to gently focus. Focus on your breathing.  With each breath, allow your physical body to relax.

Working from the top of your head to soles of your feet; each breath in welcomes calmness and serenity – each breath out releases the tension and the fear to the healing atmosphere that surrounds you.
As you physical body relaxes, shift your physical awareness from the outside to the mindscape of the inner planes.  With each breath that you take allow the mind to release the physical thoughts and images that drift through.
With each breath, allow yourself to feel the energy as it flows through you and around you – Divine Source energy that is perfectly attuning the inner and the outer balance of your mind, body and spirit.

Each breath that you take in unifies the “as above” of the energetic divine vibration with the “so below” of your physical energetic vibration.   Each breath that you release blends your core of desire, intent and emotion with your energetic divine source.  Each breath that you take allows the boundaries of inner and outer to soften until you are flowing as a unity of Divine Creator and creation.
Allow your energetic senses to become aware of your vortices of energetic flow.  As you focus on each energetic swirl; focus on any messages that reside within the energy.  Allow yourself to affirm the messages that fuel your life. Allow yourself to release any messages that no longer serve you to the Divine energy for healing and re-messaging.
Begin with the soles of the feet. Focus your breathing on your soles. Feel them relax and feel them firmly cradled within the energy of the earth.  You feel the energy vortices of your feet root deep into the earth to receive the nourishment of the earth mother and to “ground” the energetic flow into physical reality.
Move your awareness up to your tail bone area. Become aware of the swirling garnet red energy of the root chakra. This energy is the energy of the physical “I am.” This is our physical energy – our right to thrive – our right to be here on earth. Be with your awareness of this energy. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale, release any messages, thoughts or perceptions that no longer serve you.  With each breath that you take, affirm that Source energy is assuring that energetic flow creating your Highest physical progression.
The garnet red blends to the tangerine orange energy between your pubic bone and your navel.  This sacral chakra is the energy of “I connect” with others and “I create”.  This creative energy is also the flow of our desires and pleasures. Be with your awareness of this energy. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale, release any messages, thoughts or perceptions that no longer serve you.  With each breath that you take, affirm that Source energy is assuring that energetic flow magnetizing your Highest sense of joy.
The tangerine orange flows to the sunny yellow of the solar plexus chakra. The energetic swirl is located from the navel to just beneath your rib cage.  This chakra is the energy of “I manifest.”  This energy takes ideas and inspiration and turns them into a plan of action.  Be with your awareness of this energy. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale, release any messages, thoughts or perceptions that no longer serve you.  With each breath that you take, affirm that Source energy is assuring that energetic flow attracting your Highest manifestation in the physical realm.
The energies of the physical now flow to the spirit as the solar plexus flows to the emerald green of the heart. This energy that is centrally located in the chest is the energy of “I love.” This Divine love is the message of Source to us that lets us know that “what is loved within our hearts is the message of our souls to manifest in our reality.”  Be with your awareness of this energy. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale, release any messages, thoughts or perceptions that no longer serve you.  With each breath that you take, affirm that Source energy is assuring that energetic flow serves your Highest Source of Unconditional Love and Desire.
The emerald flows to the pure blue of the throat chakra. This swirling energy is located in the mid throat and speaks our truth – our authentic self.  This energy gives us the solidity of the soul’s messages and it gives us the thinness of the messages of our egos.   Be with your awareness of this “I speak” energy. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale, release any messages, thoughts or perceptions that no longer serve you.  With each breath that you take, affirm that Source energy is assuring that energetic flow resonating with your Divine voice of soul intent.
The pure blue blends into the indigo of the third eye chakra of the central brow.  This is the energy of “I see.” This sight moves beyond all boundaries and links the Source direction to the visual journey.  Be with your awareness of this energy. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale, release any messages, thoughts or perceptions that no longer serve you.  With each breath that you take, affirm that Source energy is assuring that energetic flow revealing  your Highest path and vision.

The indigo flows to the opalescent energy of the Higher Source.  This energy is felt at the crown of the head.  This is the Divine “I am.”  This energy is the connection to our Highest Source / Spirit Guide that is always of Creator God Source.  The messages of this energy are always affirming and uplifting.  Be with your awareness of this energy. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale, release any messages, thoughts or perceptions that no longer serve you.  With each breath that you take, affirm that Source energy is assuring that energetic flow serves your Highest communication that supports and re-affirms our sense of Divine Source in Physical Self.
If you feel so directed, continue your affirming flow of Creator Source –
Your awareness shifts to the warmth radiating from above your crown.  You sense a golden sphere of energy above your crown – the energetic sphere of Divine Source.  Source energy affirming your creation of Highest Intent. Source energy that aligns you with your inherent right to be nourished and to thrive. With each breath that you take, you allow the flow of energy to reach toward you.
With each breath, allow this warming golden energy to flow through each chakra.  Sense the golden rays flowing through each energetic vortex. Feel the vibrational attunement of Divine Source.  From Crown to Root, you know that you are the physical creation of Divine Creator.  As Divine energy moves through the root, you release the flow through the soles of your feet into the nourishing earth.  You affirm the energy of “As above – So below”  magnetic creation.
As you feel comfortable, allow your focus to shift from the inner energetic planes to the physical body. Each breath that you take gives your physical body more definition and distinction.  With each breath, you gain clarity to your physical place and position.  You feel the firmness of the physical plane.  Take a deep breath in and as you exhale, release any floaty or extra energy through the soles of your feet and into the earth.  Open your eyes and acclimate back to the physical presence.

Karen Glasgow Follett 12/30/14

Up – Cycle a Lamp Shade in Crochet Glitz and Glam

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Lamp Shade Upcycle

This beautiful cane lampshade used to sit atop a large table lamp that belonged to my grandmother. My grandmother stated that the lamp was a “decadent” purchase that she made in the 1920’s. Over the years, the lamp had degraded and had been discarded. But the shade escaped the trash heap. By the time that I received the shade; the caning and the leather binding was brittle and torn in several places. The cost to repair was well beyond my skill level and well beyond my budget. However, the cost of upcycling was well within my skill level and well within my budget.

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Here are the steps that I used in the upcycle process. Of course, with any creative endeavor, there are an infinite number of possibilities and potentials that can be explored.

  • I removed the cane and the leather binding. Removing the glue was quite an undertaking. Apparently “they” knew how to make glue back in that time. After several episodes of glue – goning, scraping and sanding, I decided that the glue that remained had earned its right to live on through the upcycling.
  • Since the remaining glue left some uneven surface areas on the lamp shade’s frame, I decided to cover the frame instead of going for the repaint option. I have seen many cute designs where lamp frames have been covered by strips of fabric. While I am a fan of the cottage chic styling; I wanted to celebrate this frame’s design and era by going toward the subtle glitz of “late Victorian parlor.” Crochet seemed to fit that bill.
  • I worked two strands of size 10 metallic crochet thread together. Using a size “E” hook (3.5 mm) I worked single crochets around the vertical stays. Since crochet thread has a tendency to “relax,” I worked the stitches very close together and with a tight tension. I didn’t keep an exact stitch count, but I did maintain an approximate stitch count per section to maintain evenness of appearance. (note that one design option would be to create swags between the stays. This would be easy to do with the single crochets and you would want to keep track of the stitch numbers to ensure an even swag) To help keep the vertical stitches from sagging, I hooked around to beginning stitch of each swag as I did the single crochets of the top ring. I repeated this with the last single crochet stitches with I single crocheted the frame’s bottom ring.
  • The final upcycle of this shade was the placement of the “jewelry.” I could have gone wild with swaging vintage beads, crystals and assorted adornments. But I had to keep in mind that I was going for “late Victorian parlor,” not “late Victorian brothel.” I stacked some crystals (from a broken necklace on a jewelry headpin and stitches them in place in the valleys of the bottom curves.

Currently I have this shade atop a blue hobnail lamp that I purchased at a church rummage sale back in the 1980’s. BUT, at some point, I would like to make the shade into a pendant lamp with a great Edison bulb at its center.   I am certain that this upcycle won’t have the durability that the original design had, but I am glad that I could “save” a beautiful piece of design history (the lamp frame) from the landfill.

Please feel free to visit our facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/FollettsCollectibles

If you are local to the Kansas City area, feel free to check out our retail spot at

Nellie & Nico’s Antique Mall

6495 Quivira Rd. Shawnee, KS 66216

 

(vendor 888)

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Curly Cue Christmas Trees to Embroider

Christmas Tree pictures

I am in constant amazement with the brain and how it works.  At the age of 55, I am absolutely dependent on my “to do” lists (yes, plural). As the day progresses and new things want to wander into my brain, I have to rely on my reminder post it notes to keep what wanders in from wandering back out. (It has been stated that I do use post its as a decorating theme.)

 While I may not be able to remember what I did yesterday or what I need to do in ten minutes; I can clearly remember a Christmas card that I fell in love with some fifty years ago.    Glitz and glam ruled the decorating roost in the early 60’s.  Everything was either pearlized, flocked or glittered … or some modernized combination of the three.   The card that has had such a grand place in my memory was a pearlized green that was bordered by a frame of glittered holiday red.  The image at the center was a swirling, curling flocked and glittered white Christmas tree.  This is the tree that inspired the embroidered design that is being offered in this writing.

 I believe that most crafters have a common DNA code that makes us all upcycling, garage saling, multi – crafting stashers.  With that in mind, I believe that most crafters have the items needed to create either of these trees.  The items that I used were:

Background fabric – The burgundy red fabric was once a table cloth.  The blue fabric is a painted linen napkin (you know how you pick up a stack of napkins only to find that some have stains? Linen makes an excellent embroidery fabric and you can definitely dye over or wet paint over any stains)

Single side fusable lightweight interfacing

Carbon or transfer paper

Embroidery floss and needle – The green tree was embroidered in size 5 perle cotton and the white tree embroidered in 6 strands of embroidery floss

Assorted buttons, beads and charms to your liking.

Sewing thread, needle and glue and / or spray adhesive.

Masking or art tape

8 by 10 inch frame and optional 8 by 10 art canvas board (you can use cardboard cut to size, but I had a really good coupon that I needed to use before it expired, so I bought art board)

To create the trees;

Copy and resize the design as you like.

Back the desired fabric with the interfacing

Transfer the design to your fabric.  The dots and stars were my schematic of where I “thought” I wanted the charms … as you can see, I didn’t follow that schematic. 

Embroider the design.  I used a back stitch with the green perle cotton. The white tree needed a bit more “oomph,” so I used a split stitch.  After completing the embroidery, lay the fabric face down on a padded surface and lightly press.

Sew / glue on charms as desired.  Raid your button stash, jewelry finding stash, broken jewelry pile, ect.  Nothing is beyond the boundaries of the glitz that you can add to your tree.

Adhere to the art or card board with a thin spread of glue or with spray adhesive (which I prefer)  Cut until there is about 1 inch border of excess fabric. Fold over excess fabric and tape to back of board (I used an archival art tape)

Insert into frame.  Note that this will create a very thick piece and sliding it into some frames may take a bit of patience and creative finagling. 

Enjoy your lovely creation!

Christmas Tree Embroidery

Fashion Doll Size Chairs in Crochet

Fashion Doll Size Crochet Chairs

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 Finished size approx; 6 inches from top of chair to bottom of chair

                                      2 ¾ – 3 inches from seat to bottom of chair

                                      Seat diameter 3 inches

                                      Back diameter 3 inches

 

Materials Needed;

4ply WW yarn in color of choice and an accent color if desired

Size “H” (5 mm) crochet hook

2 – 3 inch (either purchased or made) plastic canvas round (one for seat base and one for back)

3 inch (count of 14 bars) 7 mesh plastic canvas – cut to circumference of 3 inch plastic canvas circle

Fiber Fill

Yarn Needle

Scissors (you might not want to use your good scissors to cut the plastic canvas)

Sewing Thread and long sewing needle (optional)

3 buttons (optional)

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Pattern / Instructions

 

Create Chair / seat base –

Position the plastic canvas strip along the edge of the plastic canvas round. With yarn and yarn needle, whip stitch long edge of strip to edge of round until the short end mesh meet. Cut off excess plastic canvas and whip stitch short ends of plastic canvas together.  Secure and cut yarn.

Stuff plastic canvas base with fiber fill.  You can better secure the fiber fill in place by taking some loose stitches across the base diameter with yarn.  Set base aside.

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Crochet Pattern for seat and base

Stitches used

Chain (ch)

Slip stitch (slp st)

Double Crochet (Dc)

Half Double Crochet (Hdc)

Treble Crochet (Tr)

Single Crochet (Sc)

Front Loops (FL)

 Special Notes;

There are many ways to begin a double crochet round or row. Traditionally, we are taught to begin with a ch 3. This beginning Chain acts as the 1st dc  with the second dc to be worked in the 2nd stitch.  This is an excellent beginning to a dc row or round. However, this method can also create a “gap” between the ch 3 and the next dc.  For this project, I began the dc rounds with a ch 2 and dc in the same stitch. The ch 2 does not count as a stitch, but it eliminates the gap perception.  Feel free to use any method of beginning the round that you prefer to work. Just make sure that the stitch count is consistent with the written pattern.

 At the edge of the seat, you will be instructed to ch 1 and turn the round (so the wrong side is facing you) Then you will be instructed to work the next round’s stitches around the post of the previous round’s hdc.  This method creates a very defined turn and edge to the seat. 

 With 4 ply WW yarn and “H” hook:

Make Magic Circle or Ch 3,

 Rnd 1,  Work 15 Dc in the magic circle (or in the 3rd chain from hook). Join to top of

              The beginning Dc with a slp st.  (15)  (snug up the magic circle)

 Rnd 2,  Work 2 Dc in each dc around. Join to top of beginning Dc with a Slp st.

              (30)

Rnd 3,  Ch 1, Work Hdc in the same stitch as joining and in each stitch around.

             Join to beginning Hdc with a slp st. (30)

Rnd 4,  Ch 1, Turn, (wrong side facing) Work Hdc around the post of the same

             Stitch as joining, Hdc around the post of each stitch around.  Join to

             Beginning Hdc with a slp st.  (30)

Rnd 5,  Dc in each stitch around. Join to beginning Dc with a slp st. (30)

Rnd 6,  Dc in each stitch around. Join to beginning Dc with a slp st.  (30)

Rnd 7,  Dc in the FL of each stitch around. Join to beginning Dc with a slp st. (30)

Cut and secure yarn. 

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To crochet chair base bottom; Repeat Rounds 1 through 3 of Chair seat. 

Cut and Secure yarn. 

 

Fit seat base over plastic canvas seat base.  *This will be a snug fit. But since most yarn has an inherent “stretch and relax” characteristic, (meaning it will stretch and grow bigger as it relaxes) the snug fit will help assure and nice, neat look upon completion.*  Line seat base bottom and pin to base if needed. Secure bottom to seat base sides by whip stitching or slp stitching last round stitches of bottom to last round stitches of base.  (if you are working stitch to stitch, you will have 30 stitches around)  Cut and secure yarn.  Weave in or bury ends in the fiber fill. 

 

Chair skirt.  *** Note you can complete the chair skirt prior to covering the plastic canvas.  If you do this, crochet with a looser tension to prevent a tighter fit. ***

Join yarn (either main color or an accent color) to an unused loop of round 7, Ch 3, Tr crochet in same stitch. Work 2 Tr in each stitch around.  Join to top of beginning Tr with a slp st.  (60) Cut and secure yarn. Weave in ends.

Create Chair Back

 Lightly cover a 3 inch plastic canvas round with a fiberfill layer. Lightly tack fiberfill in place as you did with the chair seat if desired.

 Crochet Pattern for Chair Back and Arms

 Back

Make 2 (for front and back)

 Make a magic circle or Ch 3,

Rnd 1, Work 15 Dc in the magic circle or in the 3rd ch of Ch 3.  Join to beginning

             Dc with a slp st.  (15)  (snug up magic circle)

Rnd 2,  Work 2 Dc in each stitch around. Join to beginning Dc with a slp st. (30)

Rnd 3,  Ch 1, Work a Sc in the same stitch as joining.  Work a Sc in each stitch

             around.  Join to beginning Sc with a slp st.  (30)

Cut and Secure yarn.

With right sides facing out, join front and back pieces together by slp stitching around. Insert the plastic canvas round before stitching closed.  Finish slp st closing and cut and secure yarn. 

 Arms

Make 4 (for front and back of 2 arms)

Make a magic circle or Ch 3.

Rnd 1, Work 15 Dc in the magic circle or in the 3rd ch of Ch 3. Join to beginning

             Dc with a slp st. (15) (snug up magic circle)

Rnd 2, Ch 1, Work a Sc in same stitch as joining, Work a Sc in each stitch around.

             Join to beginning Sc with a slp st.  (15) Cut and secure yarn.

With right sides facing out, slp stitch arm front to arm back, stuffing arm with fiberfill as you slp st.  Join to beginning slp st to close.  Cut and secure yarn.

 Finishing

With yarn needle and 1 strand yarn, whip stitch chair back to chair seat working through at least 5 stitches.  Cut and secure yarn. Weave in or bury ends in fiberfill

Align arms to seat and whip stitch in place.  Then attach arm sides to back with whip stitching.  Cut and Secure yarn. Weave in or bury ends in fiberfill.

 If desired, attach decorative buttons to center points of seat and backs with sewing thread and a long sewing needle. 

 

Karen Glasgow Follett cpr. 2014